QV is looking for tallented illustrators that would like to do a collaboration project together. Contact us at quotevadis@gmail.com
"The happiness of the drop is to die in the river."
— Al-Ghazali, a Muslim theologian, jurist, philosopher, and mystic of Persian descent.

"The happiness of the drop is to die in the river."

Al-Ghazali, a Muslim theologian, jurist, philosopher, and mystic of Persian descent.

"The happiest people don’t have the best of everything, they just make the best of everything they have."
— Unknown

"The happiest people don’t have the best of everything, they just make the best of everything they have."

— Unknown

"When there is no enemy within, the enemies outside cannot hurt you."
— African proverb

"When there is no enemy within, the enemies outside cannot hurt you."

— African proverb

"What is happiness? It’s a moment before you need more happiness."
— Don Draper, in the TV series Mad Men.

"What is happiness? It’s a moment before you need more happiness."

Don Draper, in the TV series Mad Men.

"The first to apologize is the bravest. The first to forgive is the strongest. The first to forget is the happiest."
— Unknown

"The first to apologize is the bravest. The first to forgive is the strongest. The first to forget is the happiest."

— Unknown

"Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared."
— Buddha, a spiritual teacher from ancient India who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha of our age, “Buddha” meaning “awakened one” or “the enlightened one.” The time of his birth and death are uncertain: most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE, but more recent opinion dates his death to between 486 and 483 BCE or, according to some, between 411 and 400 BCE. Gautama, also known as Śākyamuni (“Sage of the Śākyas”), is the primary figure in Buddhism, and accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition, and first committed to writing about 400 years later. He is also regarded as a god or prophet in other world religions, including Hinduism, Ahmadiyya and the Bahá’í faith.

"Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared."

Buddha, a spiritual teacher from ancient India who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha of our age, “Buddha” meaning “awakened one” or “the enlightened one.” The time of his birth and death are uncertain: most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE, but more recent opinion dates his death to between 486 and 483 BCE or, according to some, between 411 and 400 BCE. Gautama, also known as Śākyamuni (“Sage of the Śākyas”), is the primary figure in Buddhism, and accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition, and first committed to writing about 400 years later. He is also regarded as a god or prophet in other world religions, including Hinduism, Ahmadiyya and the Bahá’í faith.

"Remember that happiness is a way of travel - not a destination."
— Unknown

"Remember that happiness is a way of travel - not a destination."

— Unknown

"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success."
— Albert Schweitzer, a German and then French theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary. He was born in Kaysersberg in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at his time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view. He depicted Jesus as one who literally believed the end of the world was coming in his own lifetime and believed himself to be a world savior. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life”, expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa (then French Equatorial Africa). As a music scholar and organist, he studied the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and influenced the Organ reform movement (Orgelbewegung).

"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success."

Albert Schweitzer, a German and then French theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary. He was born in Kaysersberg in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at his time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view. He depicted Jesus as one who literally believed the end of the world was coming in his own lifetime and believed himself to be a world savior. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life”, expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa (then French Equatorial Africa). As a music scholar and organist, he studied the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and influenced the Organ reform movement (Orgelbewegung).

"In the West, you have bigger homes, yet smaller families; you have endless conveniences — yet you never seem to have any time. You can travel anywhere in the world, yet you don’t bother to cross the road to meet your neighbours."
— Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama, the 14th and current Dalai Lama. Dalai Lamas are the most influential figures in the Gelugpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, although the 14th has consolidated control over the other lineages in recent years. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, and is also well known for his lifelong advocacy for Tibetans inside and outside Tibet. Tibetans traditionally believe him to be the reincarnation of his predecessors and a manifestation of the Bodhisattva of Compassion.

"In the West, you have bigger homes, yet smaller families; you have endless conveniences — yet you never seem to have any time. You can travel anywhere in the world, yet you don’t bother to cross the road to meet your neighbours."

Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama, the 14th and current Dalai Lama. Dalai Lamas are the most influential figures in the Gelugpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, although the 14th has consolidated control over the other lineages in recent years. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, and is also well known for his lifelong advocacy for Tibetans inside and outside Tibet. Tibetans traditionally believe him to be the reincarnation of his predecessors and a manifestation of the Bodhisattva of Compassion.

"Doing what you like is freedom. Liking what you do is happiness."
— Frank Tyger, editorial cartoonist, columnist and humorist for the Times of Trenton.

"Doing what you like is freedom. Liking what you do is happiness."

Frank Tyger, editorial cartoonist, columnist and humorist for the Times of Trenton.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life."
— John Lennon, an English musician and singer-songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles, one of the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed acts in the history of popular music. Along with fellow Beatle Paul McCartney, he formed one of the most successful songwriting partnerships of the 20th century.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life."

John Lennon, an English musician and singer-songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles, one of the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed acts in the history of popular music. Along with fellow Beatle Paul McCartney, he formed one of the most successful songwriting partnerships of the 20th century.

"Pass by us, and forgive us our happiness."
— From the book The Idiot (1869) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. A Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. He is best known for his novels Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.

"Pass by us, and forgive us our happiness."

— From the book The Idiot (1869) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. A Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. He is best known for his novels Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.

"Human time does not turn in a circle; it runs ahead in a straight line. That is why man cannot be happy: happiness is the longing for repetition."
— From the book The Unbearable Lightness of Being, by Milan Kundera. Milan Kundera, a writer of Czech origin who has lived in exile in France since 1975, where he became a naturalized citizen in 1981. He is best known as the author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, and The Joke. Kundera has written in both Czech and French. He revises the French translations of all his books; these therefore are not considered translations but original works. His books were banned by the Communist regimes of Czechoslovakia until the downfall of the regime in the Velvet Revolution in 1989.

"Human time does not turn in a circle; it runs ahead in a straight line. That is why man cannot be happy: happiness is the longing for repetition."

— From the book The Unbearable Lightness of Being, by Milan Kundera. Milan Kundera, a writer of Czech origin who has lived in exile in France since 1975, where he became a naturalized citizen in 1981. He is best known as the author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, and The Joke. Kundera has written in both Czech and French. He revises the French translations of all his books; these therefore are not considered translations but original works. His books were banned by the Communist regimes of Czechoslovakia until the downfall of the regime in the Velvet Revolution in 1989.

"Happiness is not for the one who looks for it, it is for the one who finds it."
— Catalan proverb

"Happiness is not for the one who looks for it, it is for the one who finds it."

— Catalan proverb

"Lead by our perceptions, ideals, fears and complexes we sometimes take away the right of others to be happy. We take away their freedom!"
— From the book “Dejame Que Te Cuente” [Let Me Tell You a Story] by Jorge Bucay, a gestalt psychotherapist, psychodramatist, and writer from Argentina. His books have sold more than 2 million copies around the world, and have been translated into more than seventeen languages.

"Lead by our perceptions, ideals, fears and complexes we sometimes take away the right of others to be happy. We take away their freedom!"

— From the book “Dejame Que Te Cuente” [Let Me Tell You a Story] by Jorge Bucay, a gestalt psychotherapist, psychodramatist, and writer from Argentina. His books have sold more than 2 million copies around the world, and have been translated into more than seventeen languages.



Web Statistics