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"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten."
— Benjamin Franklin, a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass ‘armonica’. He facilitated many civic organizations, including a fire department and a university.

"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten."

Benjamin Franklin, a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass ‘armonica’. He facilitated many civic organizations, including a fire department and a university.

"They deem me mad for I will not sell my days for gold; I deem them mad for they think my days have a price.
"— Khalil Gibran,  a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer. Born in the town of Bsharri in modern-day Lebanon (then part of the Ottoman Mount Lebanon mutasarrifate), as a young man he emigrated with his family to the United States where he studied art and began his literary career. In the Arab world, Gibran is regarded as a literary and political rebel. His Romantic style was at the heart of a renaissance in modern Arabic literature, especially prose poetry, breaking away from the classical school. In Lebanon, he is still celebrated as a literary hero. He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. The book sold well despite a cool critical reception, gaining popularity in the 1930s and again especially in the 1960s counterculture. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.

"They deem me mad for I will not sell my days for gold; I deem them mad for they think my days have a price. "

Khalil Gibran, a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer. Born in the town of Bsharri in modern-day Lebanon (then part of the Ottoman Mount Lebanon mutasarrifate), as a young man he emigrated with his family to the United States where he studied art and began his literary career. In the Arab world, Gibran is regarded as a literary and political rebel. His Romantic style was at the heart of a renaissance in modern Arabic literature, especially prose poetry, breaking away from the classical school. In Lebanon, he is still celebrated as a literary hero. He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. The book sold well despite a cool critical reception, gaining popularity in the 1930s and again especially in the 1960s counterculture. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.

"Some people are so poor, all they have is money."
— Unknown

"Some people are so poor, all they have is money."

— Unknown

"If you don’t take money, they can’t tell you what to do. That’s the key to the whole thing."
— Bill Cunningham, a fashion photographer for The New York Times, known for his candid and street photography.

"If you don’t take money, they can’t tell you what to do. That’s the key to the whole thing."

Bill Cunningham, a fashion photographer for The New York Times, known for his candid and street photography.

"It costs money to stay healthy, but it’s even more expensive to get sick."
— Ashleigh Brilliant, an author and syndicated cartoonist living in Santa Barbara, California, USA. He is best known for his Pot-Shots, single-panel illustrations with one-line humorous remarks, which began syndication in the United States of America in 1975.

"It costs money to stay healthy, but it’s even more expensive to get sick."

Ashleigh Brilliant, an author and syndicated cartoonist living in Santa Barbara, California, USA. He is best known for his Pot-Shots, single-panel illustrations with one-line humorous remarks, which began syndication in the United States of America in 1975.

"The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money."
— Margaret Thatcher, a former Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom who served from 1979 to 1990.

"The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money."

Margaret Thatcher, a former Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom who served from 1979 to 1990.

"If you owe the bank $100 that’s your problem. If you owe the bank $100 million, that’s the bank’s problem."
— J. Paul Getty, an American industrialist. He founded the Getty Oil Company, and in 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, whilst the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him as the world’s richest private citizen, worth an estimated $1,200 million. At his death, he was worth more than $2 billion. A book published in 1996 ranked him as the 67th richest American who ever lived, based on his wealth as a percentage of the gross national product.

"If you owe the bank $100 that’s your problem. If you owe the bank $100 million, that’s the bank’s problem."

J. Paul Getty, an American industrialist. He founded the Getty Oil Company, and in 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, whilst the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him as the world’s richest private citizen, worth an estimated $1,200 million. At his death, he was worth more than $2 billion. A book published in 1996 ranked him as the 67th richest American who ever lived, based on his wealth as a percentage of the gross national product.

"I get a call yesterday form a little film company down here in the valley and they’re doing the packaging for Warner Brothers on Babylon 5, which I worked on and I did a very long, very interesting on-camera interview about the making of Babylon 5 early on when Joe Strazinski hired me; and they want to use it. A young woman calls me and she says “We’d like to use it on the DVD, can that be arranged?” and I said, “Absolutely, all you gotta do is pay me,” and she said, “What?”
“I said you gotta to pay me,” and she said “Well, everybody else is just, you know, doing it for nothing.”
I said, “Everybody else may be an asshole, but I’m not.” I said, “By what right would you call me and ask me to work for nothing? Do you get a paycheck?”
“Well, yes.”
“Does your boss get a paycheck? Do you pay the telecity guy? Do you pay the cameramen? Do you pay the cutters? Do you pay the teamsters when they schlep the stuff on the trucks? Would you go to a gas station and ask them to give you free gas? Would you go to the doctor and have him take out your spleen for nothing? How dare you call me and want me to work for nothing.”
“Well, it would be good publicity.”
I said, “Lady, tell that to someone a little older than you who has just fallen off the turnip truck. There is no publicity value in my essay, my interview, being on your DVD. If you sell 2,000 of them that would be great. And what are people going to say? ‘Ooh, I really like the way that guy gave that interview. I wonder if he’s ever written a book.’ There’s no publicity value. The only value for me is if you put money in my hand. Cross my palm with silver, you can use my interview.”
And she says, “Well alright, thank you,” and she hangs up.
I’ll never hear from them. They want everything for nothing, They wouldn’t go for five seconds without being paid and they’ll bitch about how much they’re paid and want more. I should do a freebie for Warner Brothers? What is Warner Brothers, out with an eye patch and a tin cup on the street? Fuck no! They always want the writer to work for nothing and the problem is that there are so goddamn many writers who have no idea that they’re supposed to be paid every time they do something, they do it for nothing!”

— Harlan Ellison in an interview for the movie Dreams with Sharp Teeth (2008). Harlan Ellison, an Americanwriter. His principal genre is speculative fiction. His published works include over 1,000 short stories, novellas, screenplays, teleplays, essays, a wide range of criticism covering literature, film, television, and print media. He was editor and anthologist for two ground-breaking science fiction anthologies, Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions. Ellison has won numerous awards - more awards for imaginative literature than any other living author - including multiple Hugos, Nebulas and Edgars.

See a video of the interview here.

"I get a call yesterday form a little film company down here in the valley and they’re doing the packaging for Warner Brothers on Babylon 5, which I worked on and I did a very long, very interesting on-camera interview about the making of Babylon 5 early on when Joe Strazinski hired me; and they want to use it. A young woman calls me and she says “We’d like to use it on the DVD, can that be arranged?” and I said, “Absolutely, all you gotta do is pay me,” and she said, “What?”

“I said you gotta to pay me,” and she said “Well, everybody else is just, you know, doing it for nothing.”

I said, “Everybody else may be an asshole, but I’m not.” I said, “By what right would you call me and ask me to work for nothing? Do you get a paycheck?”

“Well, yes.”

“Does your boss get a paycheck? Do you pay the telecity guy? Do you pay the cameramen? Do you pay the cutters? Do you pay the teamsters when they schlep the stuff on the trucks? Would you go to a gas station and ask them to give you free gas? Would you go to the doctor and have him take out your spleen for nothing? How dare you call me and want me to work for nothing.”

“Well, it would be good publicity.”

I said, “Lady, tell that to someone a little older than you who has just fallen off the turnip truck. There is no publicity value in my essay, my interview, being on your DVD. If you sell 2,000 of them that would be great. And what are people going to say? ‘Ooh, I really like the way that guy gave that interview. I wonder if he’s ever written a book.’ There’s no publicity value. The only value for me is if you put money in my hand. Cross my palm with silver, you can use my interview.”

And she says, “Well alright, thank you,” and she hangs up.

I’ll never hear from them. They want everything for nothing, They wouldn’t go for five seconds without being paid and they’ll bitch about how much they’re paid and want more. I should do a freebie for Warner Brothers? What is Warner Brothers, out with an eye patch and a tin cup on the street? Fuck no! They always want the writer to work for nothing and the problem is that there are so goddamn many writers who have no idea that they’re supposed to be paid every time they do something, they do it for nothing!”

Harlan Ellison in an interview for the movie Dreams with Sharp Teeth (2008). Harlan Ellison, an Americanwriter. His principal genre is speculative fiction. His published works include over 1,000 short stories, novellas, screenplays, teleplays, essays, a wide range of criticism covering literature, film, television, and print media. He was editor and anthologist for two ground-breaking science fiction anthologies, Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions. Ellison has won numerous awards - more awards for imaginative literature than any other living author - including multiple Hugos, Nebulas and Edgars.

See a video of the interview here.

"Don’t make sense. Make dollars."
— Unknown

"Don’t make sense. Make dollars."

— Unknown

"It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money — that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot — it can’t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better."
— Known as the Common Law of Business Balance often attributed to John Ruskin. John Ruskin was an English art critic and social thinker, also remembered as a poet and artist. His essays on art and architecture were extremely influential in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. (via nestor)

"It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money — that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot — it can’t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better."

— Known as the Common Law of Business Balance often attributed to John Ruskin. John Ruskin was an English art critic and social thinker, also remembered as a poet and artist. His essays on art and architecture were extremely influential in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. (via nestor)

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